Russian Federation: Ratification of Protocol 2 to the South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty

State Russian Federation
Treaty Protocol 2 to the South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty
Action Type Ratification
Depositary The Secretary General of the Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat
Date 21 April 1988
Note
Membership of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) in the United Nations is continued as from 24 December 1991 by the 
Russian Federation. As from that date, the Russian Federation maintains full responsibility for all the rights and obligations of the USSR under the Charter of the United Nations. As from that date, the Russian Federation continues to exercise its rights and honour its commitments deriving from international treaties concluded by the USSR and performs the functions formerly performed by the Government of the USSR as depositary of international treaties.
 
** With the following statement:
 
"1. The Soviet Union proceeds from the premise that the transportation of nuclear explosive devices by parties to the Treaty 
anywhere within the limits and outside the limits of the nuclear-free zone in the Southern Pacific is covered by the prohibitions envisaged by point `A' of Article three of the Treaty, in which the sides commit themselves ` not to exercise control over any nuclear explosive devices in any form, anywhere within the limits and outside the limits of the nuclear-free zone'[sic]. 
 
"2. Point two of Article five of the Treaty permits that each party to the Treaty is entitled to taking on its own a decision as regards 
whether calls of foreign ships and flying vehicles carrying nuclear explosive devices at its ports and airfields or their transit through its territorial sea, archipelago waters and air space be allowed. In that connection the Soviet Union reaffirms its stand that the permission of transit of nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices in any form and the calls at the ports and airfields within the limits of the nuclear-free zone of foreign war ships and flying vehicles with nuclear explosive devices on board would be in conflict with the aims of the Treaty and incompatible with the nuclear-free status of the zone.
 
"3. In the event of any actions undertaken by the state or states, which are parties to the Rarotonga Treaty, in violation of their main 
commitments under the Treaty connected with the non-nuclear status of the zone and perpetration by one or several states parties to the Treaty of an act of aggression with the support of a state having nuclear weapons or jointly with it with the use by such a state of the territory, air space, territorial sea or archipelago waters of those countries for calls by naval ships and flying vehicles with nuclear weapons on board or transit of nuclear weapons, the Soviet Union will have the right to consider itself free from the commitments undertaken under Protocol Two to the Treaty. In the event of any other actions by the parties to the Treaty incompatible with their non-nuclear status, the USSR reserves for itself the right to reconsider the commitments undertaken under the said Protocol. 
 
"4. The Soviet Union proceeds from the premise that the commitments undertaken by it under Protocol Two to the Rarotonga Treaty 
also apply to the territory to which the status of the nuclear-free zone applies under Protocol One to the Treaty. In so doing, the Soviet Union reaffirms its stand on the granting of independence to the colonial countries and peoples under the U.N. Declaration on that issue 
(U.N. General Assembly resolution 1514 (XV) of 14 December 1960).
 
"5. The Soviet Government declares that the provisions of the Articles of Protocols Two and Three can apply to the text of the 
Treaty on a nuclear-free zone in the Southern Pacific in the wording of the Treaty as it has been formulated by the time of the signing of the Protocols by the USSR Government, considering its stand set forth in this Statement. In this connection, no amendment to the Treaty that would come into force in accordance with the provisions of Article eleven or any change in the geographical outlines in the nuclear-free zone as set forth in point `A' of Article one and described in Supplement one to the Treaty would be binding for the USSR without its explicit consent." 
Other Actions Signature on deposit with PIFS — 15 December 1986